Physiological and psychological responses through the cannon bard theory

This is the opposed to other theories of emotions which infer that they occur when only psychological arousal happens. Under the Cannon-Bard theory, the same patterns of emotional arousal can lead to different emotions and physical responses. The classic example given when explaining this theory is of a woman who is walking through the woods.

Physiological and psychological responses through the cannon bard theory

The thalamic region of the brain. The main concepts of the Cannon—Bard theory are that emotional expression results from the function of hypothalamic structuresand emotional feeling results from stimulations of the dorsal thalamus.

The physiological changes and subjective feeling of an emotion in response to a stimulus are separate and independent; arousal does not have to occur before the emotion.

The theory that our experience of emotion is our awareness of our physiological responses to emotion-arousing stimuli. Cannon-Bard theory The theory that an emotion-arousing stimulus simultaneously triggers (1) physiological responses and (2) the subjective experience of emotion. Aug 02,  · Through these studies, Cannon and Bard highlighted the role of the brain in generating physiological responses and feelings; a role that is important in their explanation of . Cannon-Bard Theory By Gillian Fournier The theory that physiological and emotional changes occur simultaneously in response to a stimulus (as opposed to the earlier James-Lange theory).

Thus, the thalamic region is attributed a major role in this theory of emotion. The theory is therefore also referred to as the thalamic theory of emotion.

Through these studies, Cannon and Bard highlighted the role of the brain in generating physiological responses and feelings; a role that is important in their explanation of emotion experience and production. This was necessary because the link between visceral changes and the feedback required to stimulate cerebral manifestations of an emotion would no longer be present.

Cannon compiled his experimental results inthen refined and expanded them, and finally proposed his model of emotion as a challenge and alternative to the James—Lange theory of emotion. The viscera were attributed a major role by James.

The viscera are composed of smooth muscle and glands. Cannon identified and outlined five issues with the James—Lange theory's notion of the vasomotor center as the explanation of emotional experience.

In an experiment, cats were kept alive and healthy after having their sympathetic nervous systems completely removed. Removal of this system resulted in the abolishment of all the reactions under control of the vasomotor centerthe region that the James—Lange theory purported to be responsible for emotional experiences.

However, it was found that destroying these functions had little or no effect on the animals' emotional responses. The cats displayed the typical signs of rage in response to a barking dog, and the animals displayed full emotional expression in all organs that had not had their connections to the brain destroyed.

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The sympathetic nervous system functions as a single unit. These physiological changes can be seen in great excitement under any circumstances, including in distinguishable emotional states such as fear and rage, as well as situations of fever, asphyxia, and exposure to cold temperatures.

Cannon articulated that these responses of the viscera are too uniform to offer a means of distinguishing emotions that have varying subjective qualities. He postulated that if emotions were the result of impulses from the viscera, we could expect fear, rage, chilliness, asphyxia, and fever to feel similarly, which is not the case.

The viscera are relatively insensitive structures.

Physiological and psychological responses through the cannon bard theory

Cannon wrote that there is a common belief that the more deeply the body is penetrated, the more sensitive it becomes; however, this is not the case. Such processes are undemonstrative and beyond our physical awareness, even when marked changes are induced in them.

As previously stated, the viscera are composed of smooth muscle and glands, which are typically sluggish in their responses. It has been found that the latent period of the psychogalvanic response in man is approximately 3 seconds.

The James—Lange theory contends that such affective responses result from reverberations from the viscera. Cannon pointed out that the time required for nerve impulses to travel from the brain to the periphery and back to the brain again could not occur quickly enough to be the cause of such emotional responses.

Artificial induction of the visceral changes typical of strong emotions does not produce them. When adrenalin is injected it induces the physiological responses typical of sympathetic nervous system activity previously discussed dilation of bronchioles, constriction of blood vessels, increased blood sugar etc.

These changes are typical of intense emotional states. Therefore, if these visceral changes were artificially induced by the injection of adrenalinone would expect the emotions to follow, as articulated by the James—Lange theory of emotion.Cannon-Bard theory.

The theory that an emotion-arousing stimulus simultaneously triggers (1) physiological responses and (2) the subjective experience of emotion. Case study. An observation technique in which one person is studied in depth in the hope of revealing universal principles. Catharsis. Emotional release.

As mentioned, the theory by Cannon and Bard emerged from their refutation of the concepts under the James-Lange Theory. Based on their experiments, the theorists came up with seven concepts that negate the James-Lange Theory. Through these studies, Cannon and Bard highlighted the role of the brain in generating physiological responses and feelings; a role that is important in their explanation of emotion experience and .

theory that our experience of emotion is our awareness of our physiological responses to emotion-arousing stimuli Cannon-Bard theory theory that an emotion-arousing stimulus simultaneously triggers (1) physiological responses and (2) the subjective experience of emotion.

Schachter and Singer’s theory draws on both the James-Lange theory and the Cannon-Bard theory of emotion. Like the James-Lange theory, the Schachter-Singer theory proposes that people do infer emotions based on physiological responses.

In the late s, Walter Cannon and Philip Bard proposed their own theory in refutation of the James-Lange Theory of Emotion. According to the Cannon-Bard Theory of emotion, emotions and bodily changes do not share a cause-and-effect relationship.

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